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  • 15th Century Japanese Art

    The story of Kintsugi may have begun in the 15th century, when the shogun Ashikaga Yoshimasa sent a damaged Chinese tea bowl back to China to be fixed. It returned held together with ugly metal staples. Ashikaga thought this was unacceptable. He challenged his Japanese craftsmen to find a new form of repair that could make a broken piece look as good as new, or better. They pulled the staples and mended the bowl with gold. To his delight, the bowl looked better for having been broken. Kintsugi was born.

  • Kintsugi or Kintsukuroi

    The term "kintsugi" or "kintsukuroi" means ‘golden joinery’ in Japanese and refers to the art of fixing broken ceramics with a lacquer resin made to look like solid gold.

  • A Metaphor for Our Life

    When we view our lives as being of great worth, yet sometimes broken or even shattered, we begin to understand that no matter the trauma, despair, hurt, fear, abuse, failure, addiction, disease, and even death, our scars and wounds are just part of us. As we do, we also must look at those breaks as a place for beauty to transpire for the skilled hands of repair to fill with gold. Each time, we must see we are more beautiful for being broken.

 

 "There is a crack, a crack in everything.
That's how the light gets in."

- Leonard Cohen, Anthem

 

More Beautiful for Being Broken

The Japanese art of Kintsugi, or Kintsukuroi, repairs broken pottery with seams of gold. This repairs the brokenness in a way that makes the object even more beautiful for being broken. It is a long and difficult process, but the results are treasured by those around it. Uplifting and hopeful, it is an inspiring metaphor for dealing with the times we feel broken in life. It's a reminder to find the gold to mend ourselves.


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Our Etsy Store Products

Below is a small sampling of over 100 Kintsugi art pieces we available for sale. Visit our Etsy Store to see more.